Intriguing Regency house and impressive collection of horse-drawn vehicles, set in a picturesque garden
The car park, Victorian flower garden, grounds and toilets at Arlington Court are now open. You’ll need to book tickets by 3pm the day before your visit. Members can book for free, while non-members will need to pay when booking. We'll be releasing tickets every Friday. Please note we’ll be turning people away who arrive and haven't booked. We're looking forward to welcoming you back.

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/arlington-court-and-the-national-trust-carriage-museum 

Arlington Court Arlington, nr Barnstaple EX31 4LP 

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Devon Gardens Trust Early and mid C19 pleasure grounds and gardens surrounding an early C19 mansion, set in a late C18 and early C19 parkland landscape with surviving early and mid C19 elements.

https://devongardenstrust.org.uk/gardens/arlington-court 

 

Countryside Mobility The Arlington estate dates from the late fifteenth century when the Chichester family established their first mansion on this site. Now home to an impressive Regency house, carriage museum, formal gardens and pleasure grounds, it welcomes around 90,000 visitors a year. Arlington is open every day from mid February to 28 October and then at weekends only during the winter. Full opening details here

Tramper hire is included in entry fee. Entrance and parking is free for National Trust members.

Lake walk / red route- 2 miles circular route. A pleasant route through the woodland and across the parkland with highlights including an avenue of monkey puzzle trees, a lake, bird hide, and two family friendly play areas..

Visitor route – approx. 1 mile. Enjoy a visit to Arlington – visit the house and carriage museum (where you can borrow a wheel chair for inside) and explore the walled fruit and vegetable garden and formal Victorian garden.

  • Tramper users must be accompanied by a non-disabled person for safety reasons at this site.
  • Due to the more challenging terrain, we recommend that you have prior experience of using the Tramper
  • Path surfaces – stones, grass, muddy patches, uneven in places
  • Path gradients – flat and hilly stretches, one steep ascent
  • Some paths have narrow sections and tight turning areas
  • A couple of gates along the trails

https://countrysidemobility.org/locations/arlington-court 

 

Historic England Arlington Court is situated c 8km north-north-east of Barnstaple and c 5km south-south-east of the coastal village of Combe Martin, on the east side of the A39 which runs north-east from Barnstaple to Lynton. The c 145ha site comprises some 20ha of formal gardens and pleasure grounds, and c 125ha of parkland, lake, plantations, and woodland. The house, pleasure grounds and gardens occupy high ground to the north-east of the River Yeo, with parkland running down the south-west-facing slope, and with woodland opposite. The site is partly bounded to the north-west by the A39, and to the north and north-east by a minor lane leading to Arlington village. The parish church and churchyard adjoin the site c 200m east-south-east of the house. Elsewhere the site is enclosed by traditional hedge banks and farm fences which allow the parkland and woodland to merge with the surrounding wooded agricultural landscape. Deerpark Wood c 1km south of the house is significant in framing views from the site up the Yeo valley.

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1000687 

 

Wikipedia Arlington Court is a neoclassical style country house built 1820-23, situated in the parish of Arlington, next to the parish church of St James, 5 1/4 miles NE of Barnstaple, north Devon, England. It is a Grade II* listed building. The park and gardens are Grade II* listed in the National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens.

The house was commissioned by Colonel John Palmer Chichester (1769-1823) to the design of the North Devon architect Thomas Lee, replacing the earlier Georgian house of about 1790, built on a different site and demolished, designed by John Meadows. Arlington Court was considerably expanded in 1865 by John Palmer Chichester's grandson, Sir Alexander Palmer Bruce Chichester, 2nd Baronet (1842-1881), son of Sir John Palmer Bruce Chichester, 1st Baronet (d.1851). In 1873 according to the Return of Owners of Land, 1873 the Arlington estate comprised about 5,300 acres.

Sir Bruce's unmarried daughter and heiress, Rosalie Chichester (d. 1949), donated the mansion to the National Trust together with 3,500 acres (14 km2) two years before her death in 1949.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arlington_Court

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