We work from home

We lived on Lundy for over ten years without owning a car. When we went on holiday we used public transport - the highlight being a three week holiday in Italy. We took the Eurostar to Paris, a sleeper train from Paris to Munich, and then through the Brenner Pass to Verona. We travelled Italy by train staying in Verona, Assisi, Orvieto and Florence.

Since returning to mainland Devon, we are trying to live without a car. We chose to live in Chulmleigh because of the local shops and its public transport links. We buy most of our food from Chulmleigh Bakery, the Old Dairy and the Central in Chulmleigh and get our veg and organic milk delivered by Local Farm Box. There are hourly buses to Exeter and we are close to Eggesford Railway Station for services to Barnstaple or Exeter and beyond.

Working from home gives us more time together as a family. It gives us the flexibility to plan our weeks around the seasons, to grow some food in our garden, to go for walks when the weather is good. These things make us happier and more productive in our work.

On my 52nd birthday, my step-daughter challenged me to learn to ride a bicycle..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtb4eWx-j4I 

With the 2021 census just completed, lets look at how Northam and Appledore appeared in previous censuses. The FreeCEN website gives free access to 1841, 1851, 1861 and 1891 censuses of Northam and Appledore. White's Devonshire Directory from 1850 can fill in some gaps. How would your life look to future historians, if they could only read a few lines every 10 years?

Three traces of past lives, 

  • William Clibbett, Shipbuilder
  • Grace Hamlyn, Baker
  • William Keats, Admiral RN

With the 2021 census just completed, lets look at how Great Torrington appeared in previous censuses. The FreeCEN website gives free access to 1841, 1861 and 1891 censuses of Great Torrington. White's Devonshire Directory from 1850 can fill in some gaps. How would your life look to future historians, if they could only read a few lines every 10 years?

Three traces of past lives, 

  • William Brown, Inn Keeper
  • Alfred Robert Hole, Magistrate
  • Mary Ann Doe, Draper

The electric off-road racing series Extreme E starts this weekend. Each race highlights one of the major problems caused by climate change. The first race focuses on deserts and the effects that desertification is having on the world. 

Soil loss is not only a problem in arid environments. Deserts covered Devon between 300 and 200 million years ago when Britain was near the Tropics. The remains of the these deserts are visible in the red soils of Exeter, Mid Devon, and Teignbridge. These soils are the most productive in Devon, but also among the most sensitive to soil erosion.

The Maize Growers Association, based in Shobrooke near Crediton, is one of many organisations looking at how best farming practice can reduce soil loss reduce carbon emissions.

Maize was one of the first crops that First Nation peoples introduced to the Plymouth Colony settlers. The local Abenaki Tribes still practice the Three Sisters method of companion planting Maize, Beans and Squash. The maize provides a structure for the beans to climb, eliminating the need for poles. The beans provide the nitrogen to the soil that the other plants use, and the squash spreads along the ground, blocking the sunlight, helping prevent the establishment of weeds. The squash leaves also act as a "living mulch", creating a microclimate to retain moisture in the soil, and the prickly hairs of the vine deter pests. Corn, beans, and squash contain complex carbohydrates, essential fatty acids and all nine essential amino acids.

With the 2021 census just completed, lets look at how Bideford appeared in previous censuses. The FreeCEN website gives free access to 1841, 1851, 1861 and 1891 censuses of Bideford. White's Devonshire Directory from 1850 can fill in some gaps. How would your life look to future historians, if they could only read a few lines every 10 years?

Three traces of past lives, 

  • WIlliam Skewes, Culm Mining Agent
  • Charlotte Prouse, Milliner
  • Thomas Johns, Culm Miner

With the 2021 census just completed, lets look at how Hatherleigh appeared in previous censuses. The FreeCEN website gives free access to 1841, 1851, 1861 and 1891 censuses of Hatherleigh. White's Devonshire Directory from 1850 can fill in some gaps. How would your life look to future historians, if they could only read a few lines every 10 years?

Three traces of past lives, 

  • John Phillips, Schoolmaster
  • Mary Risdon, Farmer 
  • John Harwood, Tailor

As the date of the 2021 census approaches, lets look at how North Tawton appeared in previous censuses. The FreeCEN website gives free access to 1841, 1851, 1861 and 1891 censuses of North Tawton. White's Devonshire Directory from 1850 can fill in some gaps. How would your life look to future historians, if they could only read a few lines every 10 years?

Three traces of past lives, 

  • Robert Letheren, Farmer.
  • Richard Gill, Carpenter. 
  • Mary Wilkey, Grocer.

From Friday 12 March 2021 To Sunday 21 March 2021

Join people across Devon and take steps together to improve your quality of life while doing your bit for climate change

Lifestyle Week Actions

Here are the seven actions to choose from - just take one to enter the prize draw

  • Food: Make a plant-based meal
  • Travel: Replace a short car journey with walking or cycling
  • Energy Saving: Switch to an energy supplier who uses renewables*
  • Keeping Warm: Book an online energy-saving or insulation survey*
  • Food Shopping: Buy food from a local organic shop
  • Goods Shopping: Identify a long lasting appliance you plan to purchase*
  • Holidays: Plan a UK holiday and research costs

* If the action you chose requires research on the internet or making an appointment, a photo of the sign up or appointment email, or the research you have done, is sufficient.

Take a photo of your carbon-saving action, post it on social media and paste the link on the Lifestyle Competition page. You can also email it to us: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

https://carbonsavvy.uk/lifestyle-spring-clean/

Social Media:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CarbonSavvyUK (116)

Twitter: https://twitter.com/CarbonSavvyUK (18)

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/carbonsavvyuk/ (117)

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCY2RyopMU1PNtAuo2z_xYuQ

As the date of the 2021 census approaches, lets look at how Okehampton appeared in previous censuses. The FreeCEN website gives free access to 1841, 1851, 1861 and 1891 censuses of Okehampton (Okehampton is in the Lifton Census District in 1841). White's Devonshire Directory from 1850 can fill in some gaps. How would your life look to future historians, if they could only read a few lines every 10 years?

Three traces of past lives, 

  • Charity Frost, Innkeeper King's Arms.
  • Rebecca Jordan, Straw Bonnet Maker. 
  • Richard Lillicrap, Carpenter.

As the date of the 2021 census approaches, lets look at how Tavistock appeared in previous censuses. The FreeCEN website gives free access to 1841, 1861 and 1891 censuses of Tavistock. Commerical Directories from 1850 and 1870 can fill in some gaps. How would your life look to future historians, if they could only read a few lines every 10 years?

Four traces of past lives, 

  • Misses Myra and Ellen Kelly, Schoolmistresses.
  • Jonathan Blanchard, Bootmaker. 
  • Henry Rendle Perkin, Farmer.

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