This plan sets out the government’s commitments and the actions needed to decarbonise the entire transport system in the UK.

It includes:

  • our pathway to net zero transport in the UK
  • the wider benefits net zero transport can deliver
  • the principles that underpin our approach to delivering net zero transport

The plan follows on from Decarbonising transport: setting the challenge, published in March 2020, which laid out the scale of additional reductions needed to deliver transport’s contribution to legally binding carbon budgets and delivering net zero by 2050.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/transport-decarbonisation-plan 

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1002285/decarbonising-transport-a-better-greener-britain.pdf 

The Exeter Transport Strategy 2020-2030 focuses on improving travel choices, creating better places for people and taking advantage of technology opportunities to influence travel behaviour in a positive way.

The proposals aim to provide an ambitious, but realistic, transport strategy that is embodied in the following 3 key themes:

  • Greater Connectivity focuses on travel into the city from outside Exeter’s boundaries. A consistent standard of frequency of both rail and interurban bus routes and delivering strategic cycle trails between key settlements are proposed. To capture those from the rural hinterland with limited sustainable travel choices, there will be a Park and Ride on all key corridors into the city. This theme also includes protecting the reliability and resilience of the strategic road and rail connections with the rest of the country.
  • Greater Places for People is about travel within and quality of life in the city. This includes a target for 50% of trips to be made by walking and cycling. This will be achieved through enhancing pedestrian/cycling networks, reallocating road space for walking and cycling and creating more attractive public spaces. We will also work with bus operators to improve urban bus corridors and to provide a reliable low carbon network of buses.
  • Greater Innovation will see the Council looking to work with private sector partners to test and implement innovative technology solutions to make travel easier and help the city’s transport networks operate more flexibly and efficiently. A key aspiration will be to expand the electric vehicle car clubs, the on street electric cycle hire network and proposed low carbon bus services and develop a new zero emission transport subscription service.

https://www.devon.gov.uk/roadsandtransport/traffic-information/transport-planning/innovasump/ 

Tramways in Exeter were operated between 1882 and 1931. The first horse-drawn trams were operated by the Exeter Tramway Company but in 1904 the Exeter Corporation took over. They closed the old network and replaced it with a new one powered by electricity. 

Once completed the system operated three routes:

  • Cross Park Terrace (Heavitree) to Cowick Street, via Paris Street, High Street and the Exe Bridge.
  • Abbey Road junction with Pinhoe Road to Stone Lane junction with Alphington Road, via Sidwell Street, High Street and the Exe Bridge.
  • Exeter St. David's Station to Pinhoe Road via Hele Road. Some trams terminated at Queen Street.

In January 1931 the service along Alphington Road ended and the final trams ran on 19 August 1931. The last every tram was driven by Mr E.C. Perry who as mayor, had driven the first tram. The last tram, car 14, was followed by a double decker bus to usher in the new age. One of the tramcars (No. 19) survived and was restored on the Seaton Tramway but as a single deck tram.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tramways_in_Exeter 

The blades of the Batworthy Cross wind farm were still in yesterday's evening sunlight. This made me think about how much energy has been produced in the UK in the last few days. Energy Dashboard shows UK energy production from many sources, including the University of Sheffield's PV_Live data. MyGridGB shows the carbon cost of each 1kW of the UK's energy. 

https://www.energydashboard.co.uk/live

https://www.solar.sheffield.ac.uk/pvlive/

https://www.mygridgb.co.uk/dashboard/

Shaping the future of transport across the South West

Peninsula Transport is developing a regional transport strategy, which plans and prioritises strategic infrastructure across the peninsula over the next thirty years.

As part of this work, Peninsula Transport is consulting on its vision and goals for the South West transport network. This is a key milestone in developing the longer term plan for transport as the vision will define the overall direction and principles of the strategy.

Your thoughts are important at this early stage, as contributions will help us understand the transport needs of those living, working and travelling within the peninsula. We need to know if you share our vision, goals and ultimately if we are moving in the right direction.

Get involved

Peninsula Transport invites you to read the vision document and take part in the consultation by filling out our short feedback survey. The deadline for comments is 17 September 2021.

The feedback will be used to help shape the development of the full transport strategy.

https://www.peninsulatransport.org.uk/our-vision/ 

https://www.peninsulatransport.org.uk/uncategorized/1475/ 

Join us for a two-day online forum across 24 and 25 June, as we bring together researchers, businesses, NGOs, the public sector, community groups and individuals to tackle global and local challenges around the climate emergency.

Hear from inspirational speakers, network, participate, spark ideas and find opportunities to collaborate.

The event is free, but registration is required to attend any part of the two-day programmebe it one session, half a day, day 1 or 2 only, or the full two days!

https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/research/institutes/sustainable-earth/se21

Social Media:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/PlymEarth (3k)

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/ISSRPlymUni 

Last year, I could not ride a bike. This year I am riding 5 miles in memory of Paul who died of bowel cancer in January 2021. Even though he is no longer with us, Paul has helped me to get closer to the person who I want to be.

Ecology sees our world as an ever-changing web of energy and matter. Patterns appear and disappear. Life grows and dies. We look at our world through lenses, each lens illuminates an aspect of the whole. These notes, inspired by the I Ching, look at a selection of contrasting ideas which can help us to act mindfully in our world.

Ecology sees our world as an ever-changing web of energy and matter. Patterns appear and disappear. Life grows and dies. We look at our world through lenses, each lens illuminates an aspect of the whole. These notes, inspired by the I Ching, look at a selection of contrasting ideas which can help us to act mindfully in our world.

Ecology sees our world as an ever-changing web of energy and matter. Patterns appear and disappear. Life grows and dies. We look at our world through the lenses, each lens illuminates an aspect of the whole. These notes, inspired by the I Ching, look at a selection of contrasting ideas which can help us to act mindfully in our world.

With the 2021 census just completed, lets look at how Hartland appeared in previous censuses. The FreeCEN website gives free access to 1841, 1851, 1861 and 1891 censuses of Hartland. White's Devonshire Directory from 1850 can fill in some gaps. How would your life look to future historians, if they could only read a few lines every 10 years?

Three traces of past lives, 

  • Mary Cann, Draper and Grocer
  • Ann Avery, Farmer
  • John Snow, Blacksmith

follow Hartstongue on social media

         

Twitter  Facebook  YouTube  Instagram LinkedIn